Criminal

A drawing of stacked suitcases.
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

If there was one thing Tyler Wetherall learned growing up it was "don't tell anyone who you are."  She would go on to live with her family in more than a dozen homes in five different countries by the time she was a teenager. 

Criminal: The Job

Jul 23, 2018
A drawing of vertical bars.
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

Capital punishment is almost unheard of in Oregon. The state has executed two men in the past half century. 

Frank Thompson oversaw both of those executions in the 1990s, when he was superintendent of the Oregon Department of Corrections.  The implementation of the death penalty was so rare in the state that Thompson had to rewrite the manual on what the procedure should be.

A drawing of a naked person running.
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

Streaking is a stunt that has stood the test of time. People have been streaking at least since the 1700's, some saying it started with Quakers running through the streets to show the "naked truth of the Gospel." These days, it's sporting events where we are most likely to see someone naked running across the field.  In the latest episode of the Criminal Podcast, host Phoebe Judge takes a look at the legal history of streaking.  

The Criminal podcast is recorded at WUNC.

A drawing by Julienne Alexander
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

In the 1950's, men and women in the military across America were given dishonorable discharges after being outed as gay. It was called the Lavender Scare.

A drawing of Evelyn Nesbit.
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

Iconic model  and Gibson Girl Evelyn Nesbit had one of the most famous faces in America at the turn of the century. But for years, her life was controlled by two men who would ruin themselves in their pursuit of her. In the latest episode of the Criminal podcast, host Phoebe Judge reveals what happens to Nesbit and how her legacy has endured 100 years later.

Criminal is recorded in the studios of WUNC.

A drawing of Evelyn Nesbit, a recreation of Charles Dana Gibson's "The Eternal Question".
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

Before anyone knew what an "It Girl" was, there was Evelyn Nesbit.

The actress and model was one of the most famous faces of early 20th century America.

Cold case file
JULIENNE ALEXANDER / CRIMINAL

When the Dallas Police Department fails to find the person responsible for the death of a college sophomore, her best friend steps in to solve the case.  

A drawing of Willie Bosket
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

For decades, children and teenagers were tried as juveniles in the United States no matter the severity of their crime. That changed 30 years ago because of one person.

This week's episode of Criminal explores the story of that person. His name was Willie Bosket, and he became known as the most dangerous inmate in New York history. 

A drawing of Masterpiece, the poodle.
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

In the 1960's, the poodle was the most popular dog in the country.  The poodle's rise to fame in America is due in large part to one man, and one dog.  The story of Count Pulaski and what happened to his  Masterpiece are the subject of this week's Criminal podcast.

Criminal is recorded at WUNC.

Secrets and Séances
JULIENNE ALEXANDER / CRIMINAL

In this week's Criminal podcast, we hear the story of a Scottish woman named Helen Duncan, who was put in jail during World War II for practicing witchcraft. The British government believed she was a threat to national security.

A drawing of plants under a microscope.
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

Botanists know all about plants, whether they're working in a forest or on a farm, but they can also identify plant matter after it's begun digesting. It turns out, that can be a pretty useful skill in solving murder cases. That's the topic on this week's Criminal podcast.

Criminal: The Big Lick

Oct 6, 2017
This week's Criminal podcast provides a look into the dark side of horse shows.
JULIENNE ALEXANDER / CRIMINAL

This week's Criminal podcast provides a look into the dark side of horse shows. The story comes from contributor Mary Helen Montgomery, who she investigated a controversial practice involved in showing Tennessee Walking Horses. 

Julienne Alexander / Criminal

  


  

In the 19th century, the weak beer and cider that many Americans were drinking at every meal began to be replaced by distilled liquor: rums and whiskeys with a much higher alcohol content. This created a lot of problems, especially for women. Men began spending a lot of time and money in bars. Many weren't helping out at home, or even buying food. Women all over the country advocated for temperance, but the face of prohibition was a woman named Carrie Nation. Her story is the subject of this week's episode of the Criminal podcast.

A drawing of Effigy Mounds.
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

National Parks and Monuments are often considered wholesome environments: peaceful places that preserve nature and history. However, this week's Criminal podcast tells how the remains of 41 American Indians disappeared from the Effigy Mounds National Monument in Iowa.

Drawing of faces and organs.
Julienne Alexander / Criminal

On this week's Criminal podcast, we hear about a mystery surrounding the death of a horse thief.

Host Phoebe Judge and Elana Gordon of WHYY's "The Pulse" tell the story of John Frankford, a notorious horse thief from Pennsylvania in the mid-to-late 1800s.

Frankford also frequently got arrested.