Constitutional Amendment

Photo: 'Vote Here' sign in English and Spanish
Flickr user Erik Hersman

It appears at least four proposed amendments to the North Carolina Constitution will be on fall ballots now that the state Supreme Court has rejected a civil rights group's request to block questions on voter identification and income taxes.

File photo of North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper. The governor addressed the Emerging Issues Forum on Monday, Feb. 5, 2018 at North Carolina State University.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

The rewritten questions that frame two proposed amendments to the North Carolina Constitution should remain on November ballots, a panel of state judges ruled Friday. The questions had been rewritten after some of the same judges blocked earlier versions of the referendums.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

North Carolina legislators have finalized two new constitutional amendments to submit to voters in November after a judicial panel's ruling keeping those questions off ballots caused them to try again.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

The Latest on the North Carolina General Assembly holding a special session to address constitutional amendment referendums blocked by a court ruling (all times local):

1:15 p.m.

The North Carolina House has made quick work of two proposed revised amendments to the state constitution that would go before voters in November.

State Senator Phil Berger
Dave DeWitt

Stymied by a court that ruled their ballot questions misleading, North Carolina Republican lawmakers are preparing for a special session to replace two proposed constitutional amendments that, if approved by voters, would shift key executive powers to the legislature.

A trio of North Carolina judges in Raleigh, N.C., listen Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018, as attorneys argue whether proposed amendments to the North Carolina constitution were worded to be misleading and mask the goal of Republican legislators to reduce Democra
Emery P. Dalesio / AP

A panel of judges was asked Wednesday to decide whether North Carolina's Republican-dominated legislature is trying to fool voters by calling for constitutional changes without explaining the effect would be to strip more power from Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper.

Ballot Box
Wikipedia

Updated 9:15 a.m. | Aug. 8, 2018

A state judge declined Tuesday to give immediate relief to Gov. Roy Cooper and interest groups who want proposed constitutional amendments off fall ballots because they argue referendum language written by Republican lawmakers is false and misleading.

File photo of North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper. The governor addressed the Emerging Issues Forum on Monday, Feb. 5, 2018 at North Carolina State University.
Ben McKeown / For WUNC

Updated 3:25 p.m.

North Carolina Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper and other opponents of legislative Republicans filed a flurry of late-hour lawsuits Monday to block referendums on constitutional amendments and to let a Supreme Court candidate disclose his party affiliation on ballots.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

12:15 p.m.

The Republican-controlled General Assembly has made quick work of passing two laws related to language on North Carolina ballots this fall despite the formal objections of Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper.

A vote here sign in Chapel Hill
Amy Townsend / WUNC

In closely divided North Carolina, an intense power struggle between Republican lawmakers and Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper will shift from the General Assembly and courts to voting booths this fall.

A vote here sign in Chapel Hill
Amy Townsend / WUNC

Should North Carolina voters show a photo ID to vote in person? That will be just one of six questions voters will decide when they head to the polls in November. Legislators approved the sixth ballot question just before adjourning the spring legislative session Friday.

Picture of gavel
Flickr.com

Voters will see yet another proposed amendment to the North Carolina Constitution on their November ballots.

Picture of gavel
Flickr.com

The House has given preliminary approval to a proposed amendment to the state constitution that would change the process for filling vacant judicial seats.

North Carolina legislative building
Wikimedia Commons

Republicans in the General Assembly rode their majority to pass three more proposed constitutional amendments Tuesday. 

Photo: A Massachusetts voting station sign
Katri Niemi / Flickr

By the time presidential candidates start descending on North Carolina in 2020, voters may be required to show a photo identification before voting. State legislators filed a proposal last week that would ask voters to decide whether a photo ID requirement should be added to the current qualifications to vote.

a man fly fishing
Benjamin 1970 via Flickr / https://flic.kr/p/6Q9NuD

Three Republicans in the state Senate have filed a bill that calls for a constitutional amendment to protect hunting and fishing rights. 

State Senate chamber
Dave DeWitt / WUNC

North Carolina Senate Republicans are looking to give voters the opportunity to add spending and income tax caps to the state’s constitution.

Photo: Venus Flytrap
Flickr user Mark Freeth

Nine North Carolina state laws are set to go into effect today, including criminal defendants' ability to waive their right to a jury trial and a law that makes it a felony to poach the carnivorous Venus Flytrap plant.

Criminal Jury Trials