Leoneda Inge

Race and Southern Culture Reporter

Leoneda Inge is WUNC's race and southern culture reporter. She is the first public radio journalist in the South to hold such a position, which explores modern and historical constructs to tell stories of poverty and wealth, health and food culture, education and racial identity.

Leoneda's most recent work of note includes the series “When a Rural North Carolina Clinic Closes,” produced in partnership with the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism. Other recent work includes “50 Years of the Ebony Fashion Fair,” the debate surrounding “Race, Slavery & Monuments,” and the “Rebuilding of Princeville” after Hurricane Matthew.

In 2017, Leoneda was named Journalist of Distinction by the National Association of Black Journalists. Leoneda is a graduate of Florida A&M University and Columbia University, where she earned her Master's Degree in Journalism as a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Business and Economics. In 2014, she traveled to Berlin, Brussels and Prague as a German/American Journalist Exchange Fellow.
 

 

Ways to Connect

Mike Mangum and Jack Kochel handle a large watermelon during the 2018 Watermelon Day contest at the N.C. State Farmers Market.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Watermelon Day at the State Farmers Market in Raleigh is no average day at the market. Families pack the gazebo area for the big show. On this steamy 90-degree day, folks came to see some big watermelons. North Carolina is in the peak of its watermelon season.

National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a new memorial to honor thousands of people killed in racist lynchings,
Brynn Anderson / AP

It’s hard to count the exact number of African Americans who were lynched by white mobs during the years following slavery. Numbers show most of these brutal, deadly acts occurred in the South, between the 1870s and the 1950s.

Rev. Jenny Shultz-Thomas, of Community United Church of Christ, leads a prayer with area clergy on Wed., June 20, 2018 at One Table United Methodists Church in Raleigh.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Faith leaders, immigrants and their neighbors gathered today in Raleigh to recognize World Refugee Day.

Warren County, Warrenton, Parks and Recreation, African Americans
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The season for cookouts, games and outdoor relaxation is in full swing at local parks across the state. It’s especially the right time for fun in the town of Warrenton, near the Virginia state line, which recently opened its first municipal park. It sits in an all-black community that has had few options for recreation over the years.

Confederate Flag, Orange County, Silent Sam
Leoneda Inge

The Orange County Board of Commissioners say they can't do anything about messages on a raised flag waving on a flagpole on private property.

But, they can decide the size of the flag and the height of the flagpole.

people marching with confederate flags in Washington, D.C.
Elvert Barnes / Flickr - Creative Commons - https://flic.kr/p/ye6c21

Residents of Orange County will get the chance to speak out on plans to clarify regulations on flags and flagpoles.

The debate centers around the flying of a mega-sized Confederate flag over Highway 70.

Juana Luz Tobar Ortega stands outside St. Barnabas’ Episcopal Church in Greensboro, where she is living in sanctuary.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

Since Donald Trump took office, the number of non-criminal undocumented immigrants detained and arrested by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has spiked. That has pushed some to seek sanctuary in churches, where ICE says its policy is to avoid enforcement in so-called “sensitive locations.”

Rosa del Carmen Ortez-Cruz speaks at a press conference on Tuesday, April 17, 2018.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

A Honduran woman living in the U.S. illegally has taken sanctuary in a Chapel Hill church in order to avoid deportation.

Rev. Gil Caldwell (far right) with Martin Luther King, Jr.
truthinprogress.com

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. and many people across the Tar Heel state are remembering the civil rights leader.

Slavery, Confederate Monuments, Duke University
Leoneda Inge

Universities from Brown in Rhode Island to Furman in South Carolina have commissions in place to study Race, Slavery and Monuments.  One institution where millions of dollars is being spent to make sure everyone has a say in how universities remember and mark the past is the University of Virginia.

Farmworkers, Unions, Student Action with Farmworkers, UNCTV
SAF and UNCTV

A documentary about the little-known woman who co-founded the first farmworkers unions is being shown tonight in Raleigh. Many people have heard of Cesar Chavez. But right next to him was Dolores Huerta, fighting for racial and labor justice. Here is activist Angela Davis from the documentary called “Dolores.”

The Women of the Confederacy monument was a gift to the state by Confederate veteran Col. Ashley Horne, and was unveiled in June 1914. It was the wish of Colonel Horne to recognize the suffering and hardship faced by women during this tragic period.
Jason deBruyn / WUNC

People from across North Carolina got the chance to speak out on the fate of the confederate monuments on the Raleigh state capitol grounds. A special committee is tasked with recommending if the statues should remain where they are, or be moved to a state historic site.

NCCU, BCBSNC, Nursing, Rural Health
Courtesy of NCCU

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina is handing out millions of dollars this year as part of its community health initiative. North Carolina Central University in Durham is one of the recipients.

World War II, African American military, African American women, 6888 Postal Battalion
Madeline Gray / For WUNC

Millie Dunn Veasey, a Raleigh native believed to be one of the last living African-American women to serve overseas during World War II, has died. She was 100.

DPAC, Durham, Broadway, Durham Revitalization
HuthPhoto

The Durham Performing Arts Center has been bringing renowned Broadway shows to the Triangle for a decade.  That might be the reason why season-ticket holders are paying a lot more for the 2018-2019 season.  It features the blockbuster musical "Hamilton."

Black Panther, African Fashion, African Americans, Comic Books
Leoneda Inge

You can count on comic book superfans to dress-up like their favorite characters for a big movie premiere.  But the opening weekend of "Black Panther" has brought out new fans and new ware. The “Afrocentric” tone of the film has many moviegoers wanting to dress the part, from African-inspired jewelry to authentic Kente cloth.

Photo of movie cover for 'Black Beach/White Beach'
Southern Documentary Fund

One of the longest running African American film festivals in the country gets underway this weekend in Durham.

World War II, African American military, African American women, 6888 Postal Battalion
Madeline Gray / For WUNC

The birthday celebrations continue for Millie Dunn Veasey of Raleigh, North Carolina. On January 31, the World War II veteran turned 100 years old.

Hungry Harvest, Food, Produce, Farmers, Ashley Christensen
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

A new food delivery service in the Raleigh-Durham area specializes in distributing fruits and vegetables with cosmetic imperfections. Evan Lutz is the CEO of Hungry Harvest. Its mission is to rescue produce farmers can’t sell because of a surplus or because it’s just too ugly.

Supporters and members of Bull City United lead a "Week of Peace" candlelight vigil at the Cornwallis housing community on Wednesday, January 10, 2018.
Christine Nguyen / For WUNC

At the recent "Week of Peace" candlelight vigil, Daryl Quick read the names of victims of Durham’ 2017 gun violence.

Fog shrouds the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington on Friday, Jan. 12, 2018. A federal holiday to commemorate his birthday will be observed Monday.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Many events celebrating the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. got underway last week. Governor Roy Cooper delivered remarks Friday at the annual State Employees program to observe the life of King.  Still the list of Monday's commemorations is long.

Mikisa Thompson, mother of defendant Takiyah Thompson, addressed supporters outside the Durham County Courthouse on Thursday, January 12, 2018.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

A North Carolina district attorney says he plans to drop felony charges against eight protesters accused of toppling a Confederate statue last year.

The courtroom was packed as the last eight defendants in the case stemming from the toppling of a confederate statue in downtown Durham showed up with their attorney and lots of witnesses.

Bull City, Durham, Shootings, Crime
Courtesy of Bull City United

An organization in south Durham continues its work to curb the number of shootings, killings and other violent crime in the city. Bull City United is kicking off 2018 with a “Week of Peace.” The organization will hold candlelight vigils this week in Durham communities where violent crime has been most prevalent.

Duke Arts, Duke University, Nasher Museum
Chris Hildreth courtesy of Duke Arts

Duke University is opening a new arts center on its Durham campus. Officials say it’s a major addition to the school’s growing arts corridor.

Anthony Foxx, Davidson College, Race, Slavery
Bz3rk, Creative Commons

The list of universities across the country committing to the study of race and slavery continues to grow. One new school to join the list is Davidson College in Davidson, North Carolina.

of Dr. Francis Aniekwensi visits with patient Calvin Elps. Aniekwensi is currently one of two part-time physicians in Warren County. He welcomes the news of a new doctor in town.
Christine Nguyen, The Daily Dispatch / For WUNC

Last week, the Warren County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously to lease the empty building of the former Warren Community Health Clinic to a local physician planning to start a new practice.

Dr. Francis Aniekwensi is a partner at Beckford Medical Center. In Warren County, a primary care desert, Aniekwensi is working to improve health conditions for the more than 10,000 patients who frequent the three Beckford clinics.
Christine Nguyen, The Daily Dispatch / For WUNC

It’s early afternoon on a recent Tuesday and Dr. Francis Aniekwensi is preparing to see his twentieth patient of the day.

Mary Somerville co-founded the Warren Community Health Clinic and was its executive director until the clinic closed.
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

The former Warren Community Health Clinic in Warrenton sits empty and quiet, across the parking lot from the county health department. Until last year, the clinic served low-income patients who often were unable to pay for medical services and didn’t have Medicare or Medicaid.

John Hope Franklin, Duke University, African American History
Leoneda Inge / WUNC

A section of Interstate-85 in Durham has been named for the late John Hope Franklin, a preeminent scholar of African-American history and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

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