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In certain places, workers can view labor rights as civil rights — places like Mississippi, where divisive issues of race and equality are steeped in history.

At the Nissan auto assembly plant in Canton, Mississippi, permanent workers make up to $25 dollars an hour, they told Marketplace. Temps start at $13 an hour. Hundreds, if not thousands, of workers at the plant are temps hired by contract firms, according to current and former workers, and local academic economists. Nissan said it does not comment on the specifics of contract workers.

Acting on a tip about explosives at a house in Lake Helen, Fla., police discovered jars of highly volatile triacetone triperoxide, or TATP — the same material used in terrorist bombing attacks mounted by ISIS and al-Qaida. Jared E. Coburn, 37, was arrested after officers were told he had a bomb under his bed.

Four people are under arrest more than two years after a gruesome incident in Pike County, Ohio, in which eight members of the same family were killed.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine says four members of the Wagner family were taken into custody Tuesday in the shooting deaths of eight members of the Rhoden family on April 22, 2016.

The four are charged with planning and carrying out the killings are: George "Billy" Wagner III, 47, Angela Wagner, 48, George Wagner IV, 27, and Edward "Jake" Wagner, 26.

(Markets edition) There's no cause for alarm just yet as inflation remains stable ahead the Federal Reserve's anticipated interest rate hike. Germany's economy shrank for the first time in years thanks to new auto emissions standards, but don't worry. They're doing fine. Plus, the U.S. is capitalizing as at least one European country starts to wean itself off Russia's natural gas.

The monkey's fur is worn away. It's nearly a century old. A well-loved toy, it is barely 4 inches tall. It was packed away for long voyages, on an escape from Nazi Germany, to Sweden and America. And now, it's the key to a discovery that transformed my family.

The monkey belonged to my father, Gert Berliner, who as a boy in Berlin in the 1930s rode his bicycle around the city. Clipped to the handlebars was the toy monkey.

"I liked him," recalls my dad, who is now 94. "He was like a good luck piece."

"Night of the Broken Glass"

It was the new Sri Lankan Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa's first day in parliament, alongside the lawmakers he was appointed to lead. But he got a less-than-welcoming reception.

Instead, parliament on Wednesday spared no time in passing a no-confidence motion against him, less than three weeks after he was sworn into the job.

A new statement from the state agency tasked with investigating a white police officer's fatal shooting of a black security guard in suburban Chicago suggests the officer could not have known the man wasn't a threat.

Black millennials are tech savvy, influential and spending about a $162 billion a year, according to a 2016 Nielsen study. And yet, black people are incredibly underrepresented in tech and media. Enter Blavity, a digital lifestyle brand for millennials of color. It started in 2014 and raised $6.5 million in venture funding earlier this year. Blavity's founders say its advantage is its community members. They'll pay to come to events, and companies will pay to interact with them. Jeff Nelson is a co-founder and chief technical officer at Blavity.

Tyler Barriss, 26, pleaded guilty on Tuesday to making a false report resulting in a death, after he placed a hoax call late last year that resulted in police fatally shooting an unarmed man in Wichita, Kan.

Barriss pleaded guilty to a total of 51 charges as part of a plea deal. He will be sentenced in January, The Associated Press reports.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In recent months, I've learned that my life is bound together with two families who took enormous risks to save my father and my grandparents from the Nazis.

What I have discovered about the rescuers is both wondrous and bleak. One family, the Furstenbergs, has thrived; another, the Mynareks, is gone, seemingly without a trace.

In 2016, Britain voted to exit the European Union but had no actual plans on how to do it. Now, Prime Minister Theresa seems to have reached an agreement with Brussels on Brexit, and she faces a showdown with her cabinet on the deal. Plus, why the plight of temporary workers in the auto industry has echoes of the American civil rights movement. Today's show is sponsored by Gobble and LinkedIn Sales Navigator

An Israeli military operation in the Gaza Strip that sparked a round of rocket fire and retaliatory air strikes appears to have been quieted after both sides agreed to an Egyptian-brokered cease-fire.

Hamas said in a statement that "the Egyptian efforts have resulted in re-enforcing the ceasefire with the Israeli occupation." The statement thanked "the efforts of Egypt, Qatar, Norway, and UN exerted to stop the Israeli attack."

Crunch time for May's Brexit deal

6 hours ago

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service… It's crunch time for Britain's Prime Minister as she seeks support for a draft deal on Brexit. After months of negotiating, Theresa May has finally secured agreement from Brussels on a plan for how the UK will leave the European Union. Also, Germany's economy shrank for the first time since 2015. We'll be in Frankfurt to hear what the car industry has to do with it. And why are women awarded just a quarter of the prize money men receive at the very top of world chess? A former child master tells us the sport needs to change.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The holiday dinner conversations are going to be intense in several high-profile Democratic households in the coming weeks, as potential candidates near decisions on whether to run for president in 2020.

Even as their staffs and political advisers have already begun scouting out office space, interviewing potential aides, and plotting out strategy for the 2020 presidential election, most haven't completely made up their minds about entering what's expected to be one of the most crowded primary contests in history.

Researchers expect that three dozen new drugs will come on the market over the next few years with astronomical prices — some likely topping a million dollars per patient.

The drugmaker Novartis has told investors it might be able to charge $4 million to $5 million for one of its potential products, a treatment for a rare disease called spinal muscular atrophy.

Black millennials are tech savvy, influential and spending about a $162 billion a year, according to a 2016 Nielsen study. And yet, black people are incredibly underrepresented in tech and media. Enter Blavity, a digital lifestyle brand for millennials of color. It started in 2014 and raised $6.5 million in venture funding earlier this year. Blavity's founders say its advantage is its community members who pay to attend to events, and companies will pay to interact with them. Jeff Nelson is a co-founder and chief technical officer at Blavity.

Updated at 11:45 a.m.

House Republicans are electing a new set of leaders Wednesday to oversee their transformation from an ideologically diverse majority power to an increasingly conservative minority in the next session of Congress.

President Trump on Tuesday announced the nomination of retired Army Gen. John Abizaid as U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia — a move that would fill a vacancy that has been open since the administration's first days.

Abizaid, known for serving as the commander of the U.S. Central Command and overseeing the war in Iraq, is currently the Annenberg Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and works as a private consultant.

A group of LGBT migrants who were part of the massive caravan slowly marching toward the U.S. made it to the coastal border city of Tijuana on Sunday. They are the first of more than 3,600 Central Americans to reach the northern border of Mexico.

In late 2008, panic gripped global financial markets, U.S. employers were laying off hundreds of thousands of workers every month and consumer spending and the stock market were plummeting. In the waning days of the Bush administration, Congress authorized the Troubled Asset Relief Program, or TARP. Some $426 billion in taxpayer money would soon be lent or directly invested in major banks and corporations to try to stabilize the financial system and prevent even more job losses.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

And today a pro-Trump super PAC called Great America Alliance released this ad attacking Broward County election supervisor Brenda Snipes.

(SOUNDBITE OF AD)

Inside a small, red, two-story house in Denver’s Stapleton neighborhood, a worker is on three-foot stilts, painting the dining room wall.

“We are just remodeling the first floor,” said Leo Perez, co-owner of A&D Construction, a small company with a crew of three. “Kitchen, half bath. We ripped out the old carpet.”

This remodel is one of five the company has going at the moment.

“We're just glad that we are staying busy every day and can provide some work for our employees,” Perez said.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection announced that effective Tuesday morning it will close four vehicle lanes at the Southern border with Mexico at Tijuana to prepare for the migrants working their way north to the United States.

The travelers have said they plan to ask for asylum.

Three northbound lanes will be closed at San Ysidro and another lane at Otay Mesa will also be closed to install "port hardening infrastructure equipment," the agency said in a statement.

What will Amazon HQ2 mean for rents in Long Island City?

18 hours ago

Devin Garner has been dying to move out of his parents’ house. His dream location: Long Island City.

“You're one train stop out of Manhattan. You're right next to Brooklyn,” Garner said. “You're literally in the center of everything, but you're away from everything at the same time.”

As colleges and universities around the globe put out the welcome mat for college and grad students from abroad, attracting those students is increasingly a marketing headache for schools in the U.S. Questions about racism, visas and the vibe on campus are suppressing international student enrollment here. The loss of revenue is hurting schools and U.S. students seeking financial aid. 

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