Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

photo of rev. dr. william j. barber II and jonathona wilson-hartgrove
Courtesy of Jonathon Wilson-Hartgrove

At an Easter dinner gathering in 2016, Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove’s teenage son and his grandfather began to butt heads. The topic was the upcoming election and then-candidate Donald Trump. While his conservative, Christian grandfather supported the idea of “Making America Great Again,” his black son questioned whether or not his grandfather understood what that meant. In an attempt to reconcile these worlds Wilson-Hartgrove wrote “Reconstructing the Gospel: Finding Freedom from Slaveholder Religion” (IVP Books/2018).

photo of hendricks and dimuzio on guitar and keyboard
Courtesy of Arts Access

At the arts celebration “A Series of Fortunate Events,” actors, visual artists, and musicians with disabilities showcase their creations and their talent. But the event goes beyond representing art, it is also a platform for artists to advocate for their own place in the North Carolina arts economy.

A picture of the band Wye Oak.
Shervin Lainez / Merge Records

Jenn Wasner and Andy Stack have created and released their fifth album as Wye Oak. The band formed in Baltimore about 10 years ago. Now, the two are working in different geological corners with Wasner in Durham and Stack in Marfa, Texas.

The name of the record is The Louder I Call, The Faster It Runs. It's being hailed by many critics and fans as their finest yet.

album cover for the sensational nightingales
Universal Special Products

For more than two decades, Charles Johnson was the lead singer for the Durham-based gospel quartet The Sensational Nightingales. His hit single, “It’s Gonna Rain” spent dozens of weeks on the Billboard gospel charts. The album of the same name reportedly sold one million copies.

The base of the Confederate monument at UNC-Chapel Hill known as Silent Sam was doused in red Monday, April 30, 2018
Courtesy of Will Partin

A UNC-Chapel Hill graduate student has made her first court appearance after dumping red paint and some of her blood onto a Confederate statue on campus.

headshot of serapio
Courtesy of Luis Carlos Serapio

Luis Carlos Serapio crossed the border from Mexico as an undocumented immigrant in the early 1990s. He was looking for a better life. He moved around, from Los Angeles to San Francisco to Utah, and then to the East Coast. After visiting Asheville for a wedding, he and his first wife fell in love with the city. They soon decided to take a leap of faith and just move there.

Reveal digs deep – and gets results. This week’s episode shines a light on three recent investigations. By mining data from 31 million records, we discovered a pattern of routine mortgage loan denials to applicants of color in more than 60 U.S. metropolitan areas. Our story led to attorneys generals’ investigations and lawmakers’ demands for accountability at the federal, state and city levels. While many people of color have trouble getting mortgages, we investigate how one prominent American managed to own a high-end property for no money down.

WUNC Music and The Durham present Music Trivia
Heather Cook

[Now that the event is over, scroll down for the answer to our video questions]

photo of mimi stillman posing in an evening gown on a city street
Vanessa Briceño

It was like a fairy tale. Renowned flutist Julius Baker was in town and 11-year-old Mimi Stillman got to meet him. Then he asked the question every orchestral musician wants to hear: do you know any Mozart? Of course she knew Mozart. Though Stillman had only been playing flute for a couple of years, she managed to impress one of the best and was launched into the spotlight and eventually had a full-fledged career as a solo flutist.

At one time in her life, Ange Branca was – and could’ve remained – a powerful and successful international business consultant. But the food and memories of her motherland Malaysia pulled her in a completely different direction, and she worked to become a chef and presenter of true, authentic Malaysian food. Branca recently joined Francis Lam live on stage at our Splendid Table Live event at WHYY in Philadelphia, where their interview began with a quick bite to eat from the kitchen of Branca’s Philadelphia restaurant Saté Kampar.

People who live in Philadelphia have known for a long time how amazing their city is when it comes to food. It’s only lately though that people outside of Philly have started to see it as a home of great chef talent. One of those amazing talents is Mike Solomonov, the Israeli-American chef-owner of Zahav, Federal Donuts, Rooster Soup Company, Goldies, Dizengoff, and Abe Fisher. Solomonov is also four-time James Beard Award winner, including Outstanding Chef in 2017 and Best Chef, Mid-Atlantic in 2011.

Philadelphia is a city that loves its sandwiches. While the Philly Cheesesteak may get all the glory and attention from tourists, locals know it’s not the official sandwich of Philadelphia. That honor goes to the Philadelphia Roast Pork Sandwich, a fresh-baked Italian roll overflowing with savory slices or chunks of pork and topped with all sorts of ingredients that differ from spot to spot. Bryan Roof is executive food editor for Cook's Country magazine and on-screen test cook for Cook's Country from America’s Test Kitchen.

Chef Eli Kulp reimagines his culinary life

May 4, 2018

Chef Eli Kulp was new to Philadelphia when his career really took off. Within two years, he was named a Best New Chef by Food & Wine magazine, Bon Appétit called his High Street on Market the second hottest restaurant in the country, he and was ready to open a new place, two hours away in New York. But commuting home one night, the Amtrak train he was on took a sharp turn at 100 miles an hour. After that accident, Eli travels in a wheelchair and works to reinvent himself as a chef who no longer cooks in the kitchen.

Sound Opinions: Slayer

May 3, 2018

With Slayer's farewell tour approaching, hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot revisit their interview with two members of the iconic thrash metal band- drummer Dave Lombardo and guitarist Kerry King. They discuss their signature breakneck song pace, favorite moments in the group and working with hip hop producer Rick Rubin.

illustration of playing cards with the words 'this is love'
Illustration by Julienne Alexander

Four years ago when Phoebe Judge and Lauren Spohrer launched the podcast “Criminal,” their desire was to create a show that they controlled. It turned into one of the most beloved podcasts, according to many best-of lists. More importantly, it set a bar that many other crime-themed shows aspire to. A few years in, Judge and Spohrer put their heads together and thought: now, let’s create a podcast for us. Figuring it gets a bad rap, they decided to chose love as the topic for their next creative endeavor.

headshot of denise kiernan
Treadshots

When the documentary “The Queen of Versailles” was released in 2012, it bragged that the film was following a couple building the largest home in America – 90,000 square feet. Author and journalist Denise Kiernan balked at that notion remembering a childhood trip to Asheville’s Biltmore Estate. At over 170,000 square feet, George Vanderbilt’s home is still the biggest in the country. Fresh off of her New York Times best-seller “The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II” (Touchstone/2013), Kiernan was looking for her next book idea.

Enter to win At My Table by Nigella Lawson

May 1, 2018

May 2018 Giveaway

Every month, The Splendid Table helps listeners equip their kitchens, stock their pantries, and fill their bookshelves. This month, one (1) winner will receive one (1) copy of At My Table by Nigella Lawson. The book has a retail value of $35.00. Enter before May 31, 2018, at 11:59 p.m. Central Daylight Time, by submitting the form below.

A few shows back we visited the taco historian Gustavo Arellano, author of Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America. He basically came to defend the honor of the flour tortilla. That conversation made us so hungry for authentic flour tortillas that we invited Gustavo back for a follow-up conversation.

The base of the Confederate monument at UNC-Chapel Hill known as Silent Sam was doused in red Monday, April 30, 2018
Courtesy of Will Partin

A University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill graduate student says she used her own blood and jugs of ink to paint a Confederate monument on campus red.

Domestic Affairs

Apr 30, 2018
Maxie Jones
Photo by Liz Mackinder

Gina Sampaio navigates the joys and trials of adoption. Anagha Mahajan tries to correct an eye problem with an inspirational poster. Maxie Jones sews things up with some help from his grandmother. Matty Struski clears a space with his daughter in mind. Tony Cyprien is overwhelmed on his first day outside of prison.

Photo, left to right: Bacon Wrapped Beef Tenderloin with Henry Bain Sauce,
Our Signature Mint Julep, Derby Shrimp and Grits with Tasso Gravy, Kentucky Mule

WUNC Music
WUNC

As we head in to the weekend, check out some videos for some of the songs we're really digging right now.

Superchunk - Erasure

The second single from the band's latest, 'What A Time To Be Alive.' Keep your eyes peeled for a cameo from Mudhoney's Steve Turner.

Neko Case - Bad Luck

still from the movie, both men lounging near a pool in the desert
Courtesy of Tim Kirkiman

Twenty years ago openly-gay North Carolina filmmaker Tim Kirkman produced a narrative documentary in the style of an open-letter to former Sen. Jesse Helms. The Emmy-nominated “Dear Jesse,” featured a wide range of interviews, serving to bring humanity to gay voices in the state. Kirkman returns to the North Carolina to screen his latest work “Lazy Eye,” a movie reuniting two long-lost lovers for a weekend at Joshua Tree. It explores the angst of mid-life through the drama of a tangled relationship.

black and white photo of jackson and best singing together
Courtesy of A Different Thread

Alicia Best and Robert Jackson met busking on the streets of Ireland. Jackson mistook Best’s ukulele for a fiddle, but what happened next was the spark that created their musical collaboration. The two sang a little ditty called “Yellow Taxi” and quickly knew they were destined to collaborate.

Sound Opinions: Songs About Horses

Apr 26, 2018

And they're off! In honor of the Kentucky Derby, it seemed like the perfect time to explore a relatively common theme in music - horses. Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot discuss why these majestic animals cross genres from soul to rock and roll. They’ll also share some of their favorite tracks about stallions, mares, ponies and more.

still photo from the film, picturing welles seated at a table and coulouris gesturing with a newspaper
Public Domain

Some films get nothing but love from the critics. They garner five stars, win awards, and spark endless think pieces. But do audiences actually like them? On Movies on the Radio host Frank Stasio speaks with film experts Marsha Gordon, a film professor at North Carolina State University, and Laura Boyes, film curator for the North Carolina Museum of Art, about listener picks for most overrated films.

Across the country, universities are being criticized over issues of money: from how they spend their endowments, to how they raise tuition, to how they award financial aid. Many students are feeling the pinch. They’re going into debt to pay for their education, or abandoning their dreams of a college degree altogether. This week on Reveal, we take a look at the bottom line for universities and students. This show contains an update to the original story about the University of Texas System. After it first aired on Dec.

Women in the World

Apr 25, 2018
Cal Wilson
Timothy Herbert

Katie Smith struggles to survive in an abusive home. Catherine Palmer suffers a computer failure while working on her Phd. Cal Wilson is inspired by her five year old son to  take swimming lessons. Liz Allen is a kid when her house burns down. Kusum Thapa is a doctor in Nepal who advocates for victims of sexual abuse Beverly Engelman is a fiercely independent octogenarian who needs help from her neighbors after a stroke.

posed photo of rashon nelson and donte robinson sitting on a sofa, the wall behind them hold many diplomas etc.
Jacqueline Larma / AP Photo

The arrest of two 23-year-old black men at a Philadelphia Starbucks earlier this month has sparked a national conversation about implicit bias. Rashon Nelson and Donte Robinson were waiting for a business meeting when the employees asked them to leave. Soon after, police entered the store, handcuffed them and took them to jail.

Surviving Being Human

Apr 24, 2018
Natsha Guynes
Photo by Jason Falchook

Cynthia Shelby Lane sets her sights on a job that’s out of this world. Lemn Sissay attempts to uncover a hidden past.
Natasha Guynes desperately tries to hide her past from co-workers on The Hill.
Matt Brown confronts his insecurities in an unconventional way
Daniel Turpin deals with the aftermath of a split second decision.

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